The World’s Worst Facebook Strategy

We all love LinkedIn. It’s stayed true to its origins. It’s for business. That’s it. You go there to find a job; see who’s looking for a job; to research companies; and to network. LinkedIn Groups have been a great addition to these core tenets as they facilitate networking with folks who share the same business and professional objectives.

It’s not surprising that there have been a slew of social media groups popping up on the service. People are joining the groups seeking ways to use social media as a growth catalyst for their businesses. Makes perfect sense. However, a dubious approach to a social media strategy has surfaced on many of these groups: Let’s call it “Like Me/Like You”.  It’s when someone posts something similar to the below in their LinkedIn Group:

 “Hey guys, I just started a Facebook page for my new Lunchtime Yoga business. “Like” my page and then post a link to your Facebook page and I’ll “like” it back. In fact, let’s just all like each other’s pages and then we’ll really kill it. Who’s In?”

This is a tactic in the World’s Worst Facebook Strategy. Here’s why:

Deaf Ears are Bad for the Soul
If you’re doing the right things on Facebook you’re working hard to deliver valuable content for your fans. You’re coming up with exclusive sweepstakes, downloadable content and videos so they keep coming back for more. You’re trying to turn your fans into true lovers of your brand; that’s why you’re spending all this time. Wouldn’t it be a shame to have those efforts fall on deaf ears? You’re posting absolute gems to your Facebook page and those “Like Me/Like You” folks from LinkedIn don’t even care. They just wanted the “like” love! It’s better to have 50 passionate fans of your page than to have 200 link swappers who couldn’t care less about the business you’re putting all that sweat equity into.

Desperation is a Stinky Perfume
To just throw your brand into a “Like Me/Like You” exchange feels like a flailing haymaker instead of a focused, precise combo. And no odor from a brand is fouler than desperation.  You remember that kid in high school that tried way too hard? He ran for just about every position on the student government but never got invited to any parties? You don’t want your brand to be that guy.

Your Newsfeed Becomes An Innocent Victim
Once you enter the seedy underworld of “like” barter exchanges, you have to hold up your end of the deal. People have liked your page and now you have to go and like pages for random companies you don’t actually care to hear from. As a result, your poor newsfeed ends up getting stuffed with useless posts. There are no winners in this scenario.

To be fair, there’s a small window when hitchhiking for likes might be justified. When you first fire up your Facebook page, you need to get those 25 likes to lock in that vanity URL. That’s when you might hurl a request out to anyone who will listen. It’s still best though to keep this to friends and family, so they at least have some vested interest in you and your company.

Ultimately though, building a valuable following on Facebook comes down to delivering a consistent cadence of relevant content and product offers that keep folks thirsty for more. Facebook apps for contestshelpful tips for your community, and spotlighting your products are great ways to begin ramping up your following. Keep using LinkedIn Groups as a way to network with folks in your industry but stay away from the temptation of the “Like Me/Like You” exchanges.

Also, if you’re looking for a no spam LinkedIn Group to discuss real challenges, wins and strategies with other Facebook Page Admins, check out Facebook Marketing Masters

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4 Responses to “The World’s Worst Facebook Strategy”

  1. Joanna 20. Jul, 2011 at 10:52 pm #

    THANK YOU for writing this article. I couldn’t agree with you more!

  2. Jearl422 20. Jul, 2011 at 10:52 pm #

    I have always said all this does is make your fan page a billboard for other fan pages. Great article.

  3. Rae Gross 20. Jul, 2011 at 11:33 pm #

    Couldn’t agree more! I always roll my eyes when I see this! They do it for Twitter as well. #notgettingit

  4. Pete Vlastelica 17. Jan, 2012 at 10:19 pm #

    If you Like me on FB I’ll tell you what I think about this article.

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